Jacob Ross and family of Kehl, Baden, Germany and St. Louis, Missouri

Jacob (Jakob) Ross was born 26 Oct 1840 in Kehl, Baden, Germany. He was christened in the evangelical church there on 12 Nov 1840.

His death certificate shows “D” as his middle initial, and a St. Louis naturalization record refers to a “Jacob D. Ross” naturalized in 1892. He is listed as “Jacques Ross” (Jacques being, presumably, the French form of Jacob) on a ship passenger list for the St. Germain on a voyage from the French port of Le Havre to New York City. The ship arrived 28 Jul 1882.

Jacob moved from Kehl, Baden, Germany, where he was a schmidtmeister (master blacksmith), to St. Louis, Missouri, United States, then back to Germany briefly, then back to St. Louis.

Jacob Ross was a member of the Badtschen Unterstützungs-Vereins (Badtschen Relief Society) in St. Louis, Missouri at time of his death. According to my grandmother (his granddaughter), he was, as she put it, “real tall.”

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Jacob Ross was born 26 Oct 1840 in Kehl, Baden, Germany. He was christened in the evangelical church in Kehl on 12 Nov 1840.

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Jacob Ross married Cölestina (Celestine or Celestina) M. Hör (Hoer) on 23 Jan 1866 in Kehl, Baden, Germany. She was born 10 Nov 1841 in Haslach im Kinzigtal, Offenburg, Baden, Germany, where she was christened 17 Nov 1841. She was a daughter of Cölestin Hör, who was born 2 Jun 1804 at Nussbach, Villingen, Baden, Germany and his wife Maria Anna Uhl, who was born 2 Oct 1816 in Haslach im Kinzigtal. Maria Anna (Uhl) Hör died 29 Jul 1862 in Haslach, where she was buried on the 31st.

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Jacob arrived in New York 28 Jul 1882 via the ship St. Germain from the port of Le Havre. In the passenger list, he appears as Jacques Ross, age 42, occupation smith (blacksmith), from Germany, village unknown, destination Missouri, with wife 41-year-old Cölestina (the last letter is indistinct) Ross and children Emile, Gustave, Albert, Bertha, and Auguste. The family went through the Castle Garden Emigrant Landing Depot (now Castle Clinton National Monument), the facility that predated Ellis Island.

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He was listed twice as Jacob Ross in the 1885 St. Louis city directory, once as a laborer and once with his occupation listed as “brick.” In both cases he was living at 2829 Howard. (See also 1886 listing, below.) Could he also be the individual listed in same year as laborer boarding at 215 Spruce? (Individuals were often listed more than once in same directory.)

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He is listed in the 1886 St. Louis city directory as Jacob Ross, residing in the rear of 2829 Howard, with his occupation listed as “brick.” There is another listing in the same directory (719 O’Fallon; see below) which is definitely him, but individuals were often listed twice if they moved, and sometimes even if they did not.

In the 1886 St. Louis city directory, Jacob Ross appears as living at 719 O’Fallon, no occupation stated, with his son Emil in the same household.

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In the 1887 St. Louis city directory, Jacob Ross appears as living in the rear of 1308 N. 8th St., with his occupation listed as that of blacksmith.

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Jacob Ross is listed in the 1888 St. Louis city directory with residence at 1105 Biddle. He was a blacksmith living next door to his sons Emil and Gustav, who were at 1107.

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The 1889 St. Louis city directory lists Jacob Ross at 1107 Biddle. His occupation is listed as paving, and he was in the same household as his son Emil.

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Is there any possibility that he could be the Jacob Ross, age 49 (so born about 1841) who arrived at New York City with 9-year-old (so born about 1881) August Ross onboard the Elbe? Family tradition asserts that the family came to America, then briefly went back to Germany, then back to America. The Elbe arrived 27 May 1890 from Bremen, Germany.

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He was likely the “Jacob D. Ross” who was naturalized in St. Louis on 8 Oct 1892. He is listed as a native of Germany who resided in the U.S. for at least five years and in Missouri for at least one year. This naturalization is recorded in St. Louis in Alien Book Vol. 15, p. 7. A card file in the Civil Courts Building, however, also lists a “Jacob Ross” from Germany natualized 2 Nov. 1896 in St. Louis, as recorded in Vol. D, p. 63 of the records of the Circuit Court.

The 1892 St. Louis city directory shows Jacob Ross as still living at 1107 Biddle. He was still working as a paver, according to the same listing, and was residing next door to his son Gustav. His address is between 11th and Hadley, about a block and a half east of N. 13th Street.

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Jacob Ross is listed in the 1896 city directory as living at 1809 Biddle. His occupation is listed as that of a blacksmith, and he is listed with his sons Albert and Gustav in same household. This address was slightly west of 18th Street. The home was about centered between Jefferson Avenue on the west, 12th Street (now Tucker Blvd.) on the east, Cass Avenue on the north, and Easton (now Dr. Martin Luther King) on the south.

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According to the 1899 St. Louis city directory, Jacob Ross was living at 1416A Hogan and was still working as a blacksmith. His son Albert is listed in the same household.

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The 1900 St. Louis city directory shows Jacob Ross as living at 1416A Hogan and still working as a blacksmith, with his sons Emil and August in the same household. August is listed twice in same directory, once at 1416A Hogan with his father, and again at 1517 Clinton with his brother Gustav.

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The 1903 St. Louis city directory shows Jacob Ross as living at 1805A Cass Avenue and working as a blacksmith.

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The 1904 St. Louis city directory shows Jacob Ross as living at 1869 Cass Avenue and working as a blacksmith.

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Jacob Ross’s wife Cölestina died on at 10:55 pm on 6 Jan 1905 at the family’s residence at 1909 O’Fallon Street in St. Louis. The cause of death was phthisis pulmonalis (consumption). She had suffered with that disease for “several years,” according to her City of St. Louis death certificate. A burial permit was issued on the 9th, and a funeral was held at 1:30 on that date at the family’s home. She was buried in Bethania (Bethany) Cemetery, in Lot 169, Block A. There is no marker.

In the 1905 St. Louis city directory, Jacob Ross is listed as living at 1909 O’Fallon Street and working as a yardman.

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Jacob Ross appears in the 1906 St. Louis city directory as living at 1909 O’Fallon Street. He was working as a watchman, according to that listing.

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According to the 1907 St. Louis city directory, Jacob Ross was living at 1811A Cass Avenue and working as a yardman.

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The 1909 St. Louis City Directory shows Jacob Ross as living at 2308A Cass Avenue and working as a laborer. He is listed with his son August.

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He was likely the Jacob Ross listed in the 1910 census as a patient in the City Hospital, age 69, born in Germany, laborer in cement (census). He is listed as having immigrated 1882, but as an alien.

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Jacob Ross died in the City Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri on 6 Aug 1915. The time of death was 4:30 am according to a German-language obituary in the local newspaper the Westliche Post, but 4:50 am according to his death certificate. He had been living at 1530 Bacon, but had only been living there 25 days.

His obituary appeared in the Westliche Post on Saturday, 7 August 1915, p. 7, col. 2, under “Todesanzeigen.” My translation from German:

Jacob Ross, beloved father of G.A. Ross and August Ross, passed away on Friday, the 6th of August 1915, at 4:30 in the morning, in the 74th [? – not clearly readable] year of his life. The funeral will take place on Sunday, the 8th of August, at 2:00 in the afternoon, from Alewel’s funeral home, 2002 Wash St., to Bethania Cemetery. The deceased was a member of the Badtschen Relief Society.”

An obituary also appeared in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, according to an online index, on 6 Aug 1915 on p. 14, with a burial permit listing appearing on 9 Aug 1915 on p. 13.

Jacob Ross was buried in Bethania (Bethany) Cemetery in St. Louis without a marker. His wife and his daughter-in-law Estelle (Ebert) Ross are buried alongside him. The burials of Jacob, Celestina, and Estelle are recorded on pp. 208, 254, and 314 of the cemetery’s records.

CHILDREN OF JACOB AND CÖLESTINA ROSS

1. Karl Ross

He was born 17 Feb 1866 in Kehl, Baden, Germany, where he was christened in the evangelical church on 13 Mar of that year. He died 17 May 1871 in Kehl, where he was buried on the following day.

2. Emil E. Ross

Emil was born in March 1867 according to the 1900 census and on 4 May 1867 according to another researcher. His age is listed as 15 on 28 Jul 1882 on a ship passenger list for the St. Germain, on a voyage from Le Havre to New York. He was born in Germany, presumably Kehl, Baden.

He was referred to as “Emil E. Ross” early in life, but was called “Emil Howard Ross, Sr.” in a newspaper account of his death. Perhaps “Howard” was an American form adopted later.

Events for Emil:

  • 1884, residing 800 N. 4th Street, St. Louis, MO, bartender (city directory)
  • 1885, boarding 827 Franklin Avenue, St. Louis, MO, bartender (city directory)
  • 1886, residing 719 O’Fallon, St. Louis, MO, bartender, with father Jacob in same household (city directory)
  • 1887, residing 900 N. Broadway, St. Louis, MO, bartender (city directory)
  • 1888, boarding 1107 Biddle, St. Louis, MO, bartender, in same household with brother Gustav and next door to father Jacob at 1105 (city directory)
  • 1888, likely the Emil Ross listed in St. Louis naturalization records, Vol. 6, p. 263, Court of Criminal Corrections (does not imply that he was a criminal), naturalized 24 Sep 1888
  • 1889, residing 800 N. 4th Street, St. Louis, MO, bartender; also listed as residing 1107 Biddle, St. Louis, MO, driver, living at latter location with his father Jacob (city directory)
  • 1891, 22 Oct, married his first wife, Emma Berl, in St. Louis, MO. She was born about 1873 in Ireland.
  • 1892, presumably the Emil Ross at 2011 N. Broadway, St. Louis, MO, bartender (city directory). This was in North St. Louis, roughly around 8 blocks east and then 11 blocks north of where his father was known to be living.
  • 1896, residing 2011 N. Broadway, St. Louis, MO, machinist (city directory)
  • 1897, residing Emil Ross at 2011 N. Broadway, St. Louis, MO, machinist (city directory)
  • 1899/1900 (about), Emil married Hattie, surname unknown. She was born in August 1870 in Illinois. According to the 1900 census, her father was born in Ireland and her mother in Illinois, but according to the 1910 census, both were born in Ohio. This was the second marriage for both Emil and Hattie, according to the 1910 census.
  • 1900, residing 1416A Hogan, St. Louis, MO, bartender (note that he was bartender in 1892, then machinist at same residence, then returned to being bartender – or could he have worked two jobs?), listed with father Jacob and brother August in same household (city directory)
  • 1900, June, listed in census in St. Louis at 367 Wash St. (now Cole St.), although listed as having immigrated 1879 (which may have been abt 2-3 yrs. too early), b. Mar 1867 Germany, both parents b. Germany, bartender, renting, wife Hattie b. Aug 1870 IL, her father b. Ireland and mother b. IL. Emil’s son Emil Jacob Ross AKA Howard Emil Ross, a son by his previous marriage, would be 6 years old but is not listed in the household. The father Emil, however, had only been remarried to Hattie about a year, according to the census, so perhaps someone else was raising the son.
  • 1901, residing 1811 Wash Street (now Cole Street), St. Louis, MO, bartender (city directory)
  • 1903, residing 1006 N. 16th, St. Louis, MO, machinist (presumably him; there is also an Emil Ross listed, occ. not stated, res. rear 3309 N. 9th) (city directory)
  • 1904, residing 1835 S. 9th, St. Louis, MO, machinist (presumably him) (city directory)
  • 1905, residing 3525 Bailey Ave., St. Louis, MO, machinist, listed with brother Gustav (city directory)
  • 1906, residing 3525 Bailey Ave., St. Louis, MO, machinist, listed with brother Gustav (city directory)
  • 1908, residing 3525 Bailey Ave., St. Louis, MO, machinist (city directory)
  • 1910, residing 5147 Norton(?), Denver, Denver Co., CO, general laborer, listed with wife Hattie and step-dau. Maud, age 19, b. IL (census).

According to my grandmother, Celestine Bertha (Ross) Bernhardt, he was killed by his son Howard. Newspaper articles confirm that this is accurate. Emil was killed by his son Howard for abuse to his stepmother. See the Colorado Springs Gazette, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 20 Oct 1912, p. 5 or p. 7 (depending on edition), article titled “Kills Father for Abuse Stepmother.” This article refers to Emil Howard Ross, Sr., 44, who was shot and killed by his son Emil Howard Ross, Jr. at the family residence “late this afternoon” (dated Oct. 19). Ross, Jr. and his stepmother were arrested:

According to the story told the police by the young man, he was shaving in a house adjoining that occupied by his father, when he heard Ross, Sr., abusing the woman and called to his father to ‘cut it out.’ Then, according to the youth, the father came to the room where he was and struck him, saying, ‘I’ll kill you.’ A revolver was hanging on the wall of the room and the son seized it and shot his father in the abdomen. The wounded man staggered out of the building and died in five minutes.

Emil’s son Howard was born 10 Feb 1894 in St. Louis and died sometime after 4 Jan 1920. Before 1920, he married Elizabeth M., surname unknown. She was born about 1897 in CO. He is clearly identified in his WWI draft registration card by the name “Howard Emil Ross,” and my grandmother, Emil’s niece, referred to him as Howard Ross. He appears in the 1920 census as Howard. A 1912 newspaper article refers to him as “Emil Howard Ross, Jr.” He was tall and slender with grey eyes and red hair according to his WWI draft registration card, dated 5 June 1917.

Emil’s son Howard was living at the time of his draft registration card in Denver, CO, at 608 18th Street. He was working at the time as a driver for Lewis Dairy in Denver. He served during WWI as a private in the 342nd Machine Gun Battalion, according to Denver War Risk Insurance Applicant record 2838, p. 247. In the 1920 census, dated 4 Jan, he appears in Denver as “Howard A.,” age 26, born in MO, wholesale (food?) packer, his father born in Germany and his mother born in Ireland.

3. Anna Maria Ross

She was born at 9:30 pm on 15 Mar 1868 in Kehl, Baden, Germany, where she was christened on the 26th. She died 7 Jan 1871 in Kehl, where she was buried on the 10th.

4. Jakob Ross

The younger Jakob was born 9 Apr 1869, presumably in Kehl, Baden, Germany. He died on the 26th of August of that year in Kehl.

5. Karl August Ross

Karl August Ross was born 18 Jun 1871 in Kehl, Baden, Germany, where he was christened on the 9th of July in the evangelical church. He died on the 12th of October of that year in Kehl, and was buried on the 14th. His name was given to another later Karl, as listed below.

6. Gustav Adolf Ross

He was born on the 3rd or 4th of April, 1873 in Kehl, Baden, Germany, where he was christened on the 4th of May in the evangelical church. He was known as Gus or Gustav or Gustave. He is listed as age 10 on the ship passenger list of the St. Germain from Le Havre to New York on 28 Jul 1882.

According to his World War I draft registration card, Gus was of medium height and build with gray eyes and dark brown hair.

Events for Gus:

  • 1888, residing 1107 Biddle, St. Louis, MO, clerk at St. Louis Combination Spring & Novelty Co. at 618 Poplar, living in same household with brother Emil and next door to father Jacob at 1105 (city directory)
  • 1892, residing 1109 Biddle, St. Louis, MO, machinist, next door to father Jacob (city directory)
  • 1896, 5 Oct 1896, likely the Gustave A. Ross in St. Louis naturalization records, Vol. 7, p. 391, Court of Criminal Corrections (does not imply that he was a criminal). He is listed as a minor, however, and he would have been 23 years old.
  • 1896, residing 1809 Biddle, St. Louis, machinist, in same household with father Jacob and brother Albert (city directory)
  • 1897, residing 1635 N. 19th, St. Louis, machinist (city directory)
  • 1897, 15 Feb, married his first wife, Alvenia (Alvina) S. Horstman. She was born Feb 1873 in MO, probably in St. Louis. Her parents were born in Germany. They married at 2506 Benton St. in St. Louis, MO.
  • 1898, 29 Dec, his son Oliver V. Ross was born in St. Louis, MO. His middle initial is clearly “V” on his WWI draft registration card and in the 1900 census. The draft registration card describes him as tall and slender with blue eyes and brown hair. On 12 Sep 1918 he was living at 3219 B Cass Avenue, St. Louis, MO (his parents’ residence) and was working for what looks like “M&O” Railroad at 7th and Pine, St. Louis, MO, according to his WWI draft registration card. In the 1930 census, he was living at 6050 Carlsbad, St. Louis, MO, and working as a stenographer for the railroad. He was renting at the time, with his wife Barbara and daughters. Could he be the Oliver Ross listed in the Social Security Death Index as born 28 Dec 1898 (the WWI draft registration card gives 29 Dec 1898), died Nov 1968 Atlantic City, NJ, with SSN issued in NJ? (There is no other SSDI listing that comes close.)
  • 1899, residing 1517 Clinton, St. Louis, MO, machinist (city directory)
  • 1900, residing 1517 Clinton, St. Louis, MO, machinist, listed with brother August (city directory)
  • 1900, residing 1517 Clinton, St. Louis, MO, machinist (census)
  • 1904, residing 4010 N. Grand Ave., St. Louis, MO, machinist (city directory)
  • 1905, residing 3525 Bailey Ave., St. Louis, MO, foreman, listed with brother Emil (city directory)
  • 1906, residing 3525 Bailey Ave., St. Louis, MO, machinist, listed with brother Emil (city directory)
  • 1906, 6 Oct, his first wife Alvenia S. Horstman died at 3525 Bailey Avenue in St. Louis. According to an online index, an obituary appeared in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on 7 Oct 1906. She was buried in St. Peter’s Cemetery.
  • 1907, residing 2033A Alice Ave., St. Louis, MO, occupation: tool (city directory)
  • 1907, 30 Mar, married his second wife, Viola Belle Skinner, called Belle or Bell, presumably in St. Louis, MO. She was born 8 Aug 1875 in WI, and was a daughter of William and Margaret Jane (Watson) Skinner.
  • 1909, residing 2725 Howard, St. Louis, MO, machinist (city directory)
  • 1910, residing 2725 Howard, St. Louis, MO, machinist (city directory)
  • 1910, 25 Apr, 2725 [Howard, but street name not given], St. Louis, MO, “foreman, machine shop,” renting. Listed as Gustave A. Ross, in 2nd marriage, with wife Viola B., also in 2nd marriage, married 3 years, listed with son Oliver V. or U. (census).
  • 1911, residing 2725 Howard, St. Louis, MO, machinist (city directory)
  • 1918, 12 Sep, residing 3219 B Cass Ave., St. Louis, MO, tool room foreman for Central Machine Works, 12th & Tyler, St. Louis, MO (WWI draft registration card, 12 Sep 1918)
  • 1932, Nov 26, residing 3520 Ohio Avenue, St. Louis, MO (wife Belle Ross’s address as informant on her mother’s death certificate)
  • 1945, 15 Feb, Gustav Ross died at City Hospital #1, cause “Carcinoma of Prostate[,] Fracture of Rt. Humorus, suffered when deceased fell to the floor at his home 3421 So Spring Ave on Jan 4th 1945 exact time unknown[.]” (death certificate), residing at time of death at 3421 S. Spring Avenue, St. Louis, MO; widow Viola Belle (Skinner) Ross continued to live there until she died the next month (death certicates); Gustav’s obituary appeared, according to an online index, in the St. Louis
    Post-Dispatch
    on 16 Feb 1945, with burial permit listing appearing on 18 Feb 1945. Gustav’s body was cremated at Missouri Crematory.
  • 1945, 2 Mar, his second wife Belle/Bell died in the City Hospital in St. Louis of coronary sclerosis and arteriosclerosis. She had been living at 3421 S. Spring Avenue at the time that she died. Her body was cremated at Missouri Crematory.

7. Karl August Ross (again)

The second son to be named karl August Ross was born in Kehl, Baden, Germany on 5 Oct 1874 and was christened in the evangelical church on 1 Nov 1874. He died 4 Feb 1877 in Kehl, where he was buried on the 6th.

8. Albert Ross

Albert Ross was born in Kehl, Baden, Germany on 11 Dec 1875. He is listed at age 6 on the ship passenger list of the St. Germain, traveling from Le Havre to New York, which arrived 28 Jul 1882. Albert Ross was called Al.

Events for Albert Ross:

  • 1886, Jan 3, probably the Al Ross mentioned in the St. Louis Globe-Democrat: “Officer Maher arrested a man named Al Ross at 9:30 last night for attempting to turn in an alarm of fire from box 98, Howard and Fourteenth.”
  • 1896, residing 1809 Biddle, St. Louis, MO, clerk, listed in same household with father Jacob and brother Gustav (city directory)
  • 1899, residing 1416A Hogan, St. Louis, MO, machinist, listed in same household with father Jacob (city directory)
  • 1900, Albert Ross appears to disappear from St. Louis city directories from this point on. According to my grandmother Celestine Bertha (Ross) Bernhardt, he was killed in Mexico after moving there with a business partner. According to her story, they both moved to Mexico, supposedly for their health; Albert would go to the post office periodically to get money from the States and after one of his trips to the post office he was killed for the money that he had just received. He was dead by 6 Aug 1915. In actuality, he moved to New Mexico, rather than Mexico, where he was killed in Jun 1908. His death made front-page headlines in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on 26 Jun 1908:  “Murdered Man Claimed to be a St. Louisan.”  Another article appeared on page 2 on the following day, titled “Murderer of a St. Louisan is Still at Large.”  The articles explained that it was said that he was in New Mexico for his health, and that he was killed by a “dirk” after leaving with a certain Theodore Kulig from 45 miles northwest of Roswell for Albuquerque.  Kulig was believed to have committed the murder.  Family members indicated that they wanted the body shipped back to St. Louis for burial in Bethania (Bethany) Cemetery on St. Charles Rock Road.

9. Bertha Ross

Bertha was born 31 May 1877 in Kehl, Baden, Germany. She is listed as age 5 on the ship passenger list of the St. Germain, traveling from Le Havre to New York, which arrived 28 Jul 1882.

She married John Henry Kahrs, called Henry, who was born in 1876 in New York State. He was a florist according to family tradition, but was a dairy driver at the time of his death according to his death certificate. According to family tradition, Bertha and husband Henry Kahrs had at least one child.

Bertha’s death was noted in the Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, NY, 6 Aug 1907: “In Buffalo, N.Y. Bertha Kahrs, wife of John Henry Kahrs, resident of St. Louis. Due notice of funeral will be given later. St. Louis papers please copy.”

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch also discussed Bertha’s death in “Mrs. Kahrs Dies in Buffalo,” 5 Aug 1907, p. 4. That article explains that she and her husband were on their way to the Catskills in New York State for a vacation when she felt too fatigued to continue the trip. They stopped over in Buffalo when her husband was called back to St. Louis on business.  A few hours after he left, Bertha died in Buffalo.  The article noted that she was survived by her husband, her father, and three brothers, but did not mention any children.

A brief reference to Bertha’s death also appears in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on 5 Aug 1907, p. 10: “KAHRS – Mrs. Bertha Kahrs (nee Ross), wife of John Henry Kahrs, 1811 Cass avenue, at Buffalo, N.Y. due notice of funeral later.”

After Bertha died, John Henry Kahrs evidently remarried, and an article in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (13 Mar 1911, p. 9) appears to refer to his second wife: ” . . . The only other young woman reported missing Sunday was Mrs. John H. Kahrs, 27 years old, the wife of a florist at 1508 [?] Cass avenue. Kahrs told the police that when his wife called him to supper at 10 p. m. Saturday he told he[r] he was too busy to eat. She disappeared a few minutes later, after telling an errand boy in the flower store that she was going to commit suicide.”

Display ads for Kahrs Florist appear in various St. Louis newspaper issues during the latter half of the decade of the 1900s.

John Henry Kahrs died 1 Aug 1914 at St. Mary’s Infirmary in St. Louis, MO of milliary tuberculosis. His body was shipped east for burial on the 2nd in Hoboken, NJ.  He had been a son of Henry Kahrs and his wife Anna (Panken) Kahrs, who were both born in Germany.

10. Hermine Ross

Hermine Ross was born 24 Dec 1878 in Kehl, Baden, Germany, where he was christened in the evangelical church 26 Jan 1879. He died in Kehl 12 Sep 1879, the same year in which he was christened, and was buried in Kehl on the 14th.

11. August Charles Ross

August Charles Ross was born 7 May 1880 in Kehl, Baden, Germany, where he was christened in the evangelical church 6 Jun of the same year. His St. Louis, MO confirmation certificate states that he was born in 1880. He was called A.C. or August. He is listed as two-year-old “Auguste” in the ship passenger list of the St. Germain from le Havre to New York, which arrived 28 Jul 1882

Events for August Ross:

  • 1894, 18 Mar, confirmed (age 13) at Evangelical Zionskirche, St. Louis, MO (C.F. Obermeyer was pastor). Confirmation record states that he was b. 1880 Germany.
  • 1900, listed twice in St. Louis city directory, once with father Jacob and brother Emil at 1416A Hogan and again with brother Gustav at 1517 Clinton. Occupation in both listings is machinist.
  • 1902, 14 Sep, August’s daughter Celestine Bertha Ross was born in St. Louis, MO.
  • 1902, 24 Sep, August married Wilhelmine Emilie Estelle Ebert, called Estella or Stella, in St. Louis, MO. She was born Oct 1879 in St. Louis, MO, a daughter of Heinrich (Henry) and Rosalle (Reimann) Eperty/Ebert.
  • 1903, residing rear, 1721 Biddle, St. Louis, MO, clerk (city directory)
  • 1904, residing 1518 Biddle, St. Louis, MO, machinist (city directory)
  • 1905, residing 1518 Biddle, St. Louis, MO, fireman (city directory)
  • 1905, 10 Apr, August’s daughter Viola Alvina was born in St. Louis.
  • 1906, residing 1518 Biddle, St. Louis, MO, fireman (city directory)
  • 1907, two August Ross listings appear in St. Louis city directories: 4502 N. Broadway, boiler; and rear, 1442 Chambers, machinist
  • 1908, residing 1913 O’Fallon Avenue, St. Louis, MO, machinist (note that his father Jacob was listed in 1906 directory at 1909 O’Fallon Avenue) (city directory)
  • 1909, residing 2308A Cass Avenue, St. Louis, MO, machinist, listed with father Jacob (city directory)
  • 1909, 17 Mar, Estella (Ebert) Ross died in St. Louis, MO. She was buried on the 20th in Bethania (Bethany) Cemetery beside her Ross parents-in-law. Her body was driven to the cemetery in a horse-drawn coach by a man with a stovepipe hat, according to my grandmother (Estella’s daughter).
  • 1911, presumably the August C. Ross with no occupation listed, residing 2227 Locust, St. Louis, MO (city directory)
  • 1915, residing N. Jefferson Avenue, St. Louis, MO, occupation elevator (presumably him) (city directory)
  • 1916, residing Jefferson Avenue, St. Louis, MO, occupation elevator (presumably him) (city directory)
  • 1920 census, 2800 Locust Street, St. Louis, MO, presumably him listed as August C. Ross, hotel clerk, even though some of the details are in error. (Fabricated or erroneous information would not be unlikely if he happened to have been out at the time the census was taken.) He is listed as 44 (should have been about 40), born TX (should have been Germany). He is listed as “head” (specified as “clerk, hotel”) followed by a list of lodgers. Although the name of the hotel is not given, a 1907 record (not pertaining to the family) states that the Crescent Hotel was at 2800 Locust.
  • 1939, residing 1510 Market, St. Louis, MO, clerk Palace Hotel (city directory)
  • 1942, residing 1510 Market, St. Louis, MO, clerk Palace Hotel (city directory)
  • 1944, residing 1510 Market, St. Louis, MO, clerk Palace Hotel (city directory)
  • 1949, 11 May, August Ross died in Pine Crest Home #2, Manchester, St. Louis Co., MO. He had been living at 2628 Endicott Ave., Overland, St. Louis Co., MO shortly before his death. The informant on his death certificate was Ella Anders, who lived at the same address given as August’s usual residence. He was buried in Fee Fee Cemetery by Baumann Brothers of Overland.


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3 responses to “Jacob Ross and family of Kehl, Baden, Germany and St. Louis, Missouri

  1. Hello Mr Ross,
    I just found your wordpress-site.
    My maiden name is Birgit Ross (born 1957). I found, that my grandfather Albert Ross, had been born in 1899 in Kehl. He was killed in Stalingrad in the war 1944
    I found his “Wehrpass”. His father’s name had been Michael Ross born in Kehl married to Friderike Ross, born Bernhardt.
    I remember in my childhood my father Werner Ross told me about his grandfather and about the emigration to USA of the brother of his grandfather.
    Have you got any informations? Are we related?
    Best wishes
    Birgit Ross (married Essig)

  2. Hey Steve,
    A lot of detail about the Ross family in US that I didn’t have – cool!

    Couple of things I’ve found:
    1. The middle initial “V” for Jacob actually denoted that he was the fifth Jacob Ross living in Kehl. So many people in town had the same names that the pastor had to start numbering them!
    2. Emil Jacob Ross was born and died in 1894, so the son that killed Emil Sr. is a different kid.

    I now have all the Ross ancestors in Kehl traced back as far as the church records go (1561). Send me your e-mail address and I’ll e-mail you all the stuff I have.

    Happy holidays!
    Ross

    • James M. Fritz

      I was interested in the information you mentioned. My line of descent goes back to Katherina Ross (c 3 January 1664-1 October 1712) wh married Gabriel Geyler. I show her father as Jacob Ross, son of Jacob Ross who was himself the son of Lorentz Ross. Any additional information which you could provide would be appreciated. What do you know about the origins of the surname Ross. My wife’s maiden name was Ross but her ancestry extends to Scotland. Her Scottish ancestors arrived here well before the Revolutionary War.
      Thanks. Jim Fritz,

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